Traveling With Your Dog 101

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Taking your dog on holiday with you increases fun and lightens the worry of not knowing what’s happening with your dog while you’re not at home. Here are some trip advice to make traveling with your dog a wonderful experience.

Safety

You should take your dog to the veterinarian for a check-up before going on a long trip. Make sure the vaccinations are up to date and ask for health certifications which are a prerequisite for airline travel.

dog travel

Additionally you should take with you a supply of his food and any medications he needs. For example, if your dog has nauseas during car traveling you should buy some antiemetic medication like Cerenia®.

Crates

A crate is essential to keep your dog safe in the car. It is obligatory for airline travel. Crates are obtainable in pet shops.

If your dog is inside a crate you will be less distracted while driving which is safer. It also avoids your dog from becoming a projectile if you have to stop fast.

Crate’s ideal features:

  • Adequate size to allow the dog to stand, turn and lie down
  • Strong with handles
  • Free of interior protuberances
  • Bottom protected with absorbent material
  • Ventilation on opposite sides

You should wright down a label with the following information: “Live Animal”, owner’s name, address and phone number. In addition you can stick some arrows upright on the crate. Inside the crate your dog should have a comfy pet mat and his favorite toy. Make sure your dog has been well exercised before he goes in the crate. You should let him go into the crate on his own.

Identification

You dog should be accurately identified. He should have a durable leash and collar. The collar should have identification tags with the dog’s name, your name, and your phone number. Applying a permanent method of identification, such as a microchip is perfect. Don’t forget to bring a current picture of your dog with you.

Traveling

By car

My advice is to get your dog used to the car going for short rides. Your dog should travel in a well ventilated car with an unfilled stomach. Stop frequently for exercise and potty breaks. Wait for travel breaks to give your Boxer a small snack, if possible high in protein.

Above all don’t leave your dog in a parked car, especially when it’s hot summer. Even with the window open, the car can rapidly turn into an oven, and your dog will get dehydrated and develop a heat stroke.

By plane

You should call to the airline asking for information about rules for canine air travel. In general, all airlines require health certifications and evidence of vaccinations. Dogs should fast for at least 6 hours before the trip and should urinate and defecate as close to the departure time as possible. Make sure your dog has access to water to keep hydrated.

Accommodation

Find out in advance which hotels at your destination or on your itinerary accept dogs. You should keep your dog as quiet as possible. Many dogs will bark or destroy stuff if left alone in a strange place.

Top Tips to prevent problems:

  1. See your veterinarian before travelling
  2. Get a health certificate from your vet
  3. Advice with your vet about sedatives. Especially if your dog has had travel anxiety in the past
  4. Try any new sedatives or medications before you leave. Your dog may be allergic to some medications, it is better that you find out before the travel.
  5. Get information about the rules at your destination
  6. Dogs are creatures of routine. Your Boxer will need daily walks no matter where your vacation spot is.